SASLI Faculty

Faculty for SASLI are hired anew each summer; this list contains both current and former instructors. Please select the language on the menu above to learn who has taught which courses.


Mandira Bhaduri

Mandira Bhaduri

Mandira Bhaduri is a native Bangla speaker. She received her MA in Comparative Literature From Jadavpur University in Kolkata in 1989. Since 1995 she has worked as a Bengali language instructor at The American Institute of Indian Studies. in 2004 she started the Bangla Program in the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and taught there until 2007. Ms. Bhaduri currently works as a Bangla Lecturer at the University of Chicago. She has taught Bengali at the SASLI since the summer of 2005. She is interested in modern pedagogy for language teaching. She runs a blog for Bangla students as a supporting element for her class and also as a resource for Bangla teachers.


Vivek G. Bharathan

Vivek G. Bharathan

Vivek Bharathan served as an Oberlin Shansi Fellow at The American College, Madurai from 2005 to 2007. Currently he is an Online Communications Assistant at Brooklyn Law School. Mr. Bharathan comes to Madison armed with a cricket set, and you should find him if you'd like to learn how to play.


Avaneesh Bhatt

Avaneesh Bhatt

Avaneesh Bhatt is a graduate student at the University of Chicago. His focus is Gujarati Literature and History. He has two books to his credit, both are translations from English into Gujarati and are published in India by reputed publishers. Avaneesh has received Katha Translation Award (1998) for his English translation of a folk-tale.


Neilesh Bose

Neilesh Bose

Neilesh Bose received an MA in Social Science from the University of Chicago and is a PhD candidate in History at Tufts University. Neilesh aims to enter a teaching and research career in the discipline of History, with a focus on modern South Asia. Primary research interests include 20th century Bengal, 20th century South Asia, nationalism, communalism, and thematic interests include intellectual history of political thought in South Asia. His secondary interests include theatre studies, South Asian theatre, performance theory, South Africa, and the South Asian diaspora. Neilesh has many hears of teaching experience at Tufts University, Harvard and Lesley College teaching History. He has also taught Bengali at SASLI for the 2003 and 2004 summers. Neilesh has received a fellowship from the AIIS as well as research grants from Tufts University, the American Institute of Bangladesh Studies, and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program.


Ryan Brizendine

Ryan Brizendine is a graduate student at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He has taught classes on the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and has served as Program Assistant for a study abroad program in South India, alongside living and studying in several different parts of the subcontinent.


Gregory

Gregory "Max" Bruce

Max Bruce holds a degree from the University of California-Santa Cruz in Philosophy. He is a graduate student in the Asian Studies department at the University of Texas-Austin where he studies Urdu literature. Mr. Bruce has received several awards to study Urdu and Persian in South Asia, including UC Berkeley's BULPIP award and the American Institute of Indian Studies Academic Year Advanced Language Program fellowship. Mr. Bruce worked as a faculty assistant for the Elementary and Intermediate Urdu classes at SASLI in 2008. He currently teaches in the Hindi-Urdu Flagship Program at the University of Texas at Austin.


Paromita Chakraborti

Paromita Chakraborti

Paromita Chakraborti’s PhD dissertation is entitled Diglossia in Bengali. This, she completed at the University of New Mexico , Albuquerque in 2003. Paromita has been a lead investigator for a SALRC mini-project on the development of web-based pedagogical materials for Bangla from June 2004 to August 2005. She is a linguist with eight years of combined experience in the field of linguistics research as well as teaching various undergraduate and graduate level courses in universities here in the US as well as in India . Paromita has experience in teaching Bangla to young heritage children of the Greater Philadelphia region. She has a degree in Indian Classical Dance and is active in the cultural activities of the Bengali Cultural Organization of the Greater Philadelphia region.


Tsetan Chonjore

Tsetan Chonjore

Tsetan Chonjore earned his degree in Advanced Tibetan Language Studies at St Joseph's College in India under Geshe Ngawang Jinpa. He has been involved in Tibetan language instruction for over 20 years as instructor, lecturer, research fellow, director, and coordinator of various Tibetan language initiatives in Nepal, the United States and Canada. Mr. Chonjore has been teaching Tibetan for the University of Wisconsin, Madison summer program since 1986. He also taught the first year Tibetan course for SASLI 2003 and 2004. Prior to the University of Wisconsin College Year in Nepal program closure, he taught advanced Tibetan for program students in Kathmandu during both Fall and Spring sessions. In Spring 2005, he taught at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Mr. Chonjore has presented numerous papers on Tibetan language at the Annual Linguistic Converence, Tribhuvan University, Kathamand, Nepal and is the author of Colloquial Tibetan (with Andrea Abinanti, Library of Tibetan Works and Archives) and a few other textbooks.


Victor D'Avella

Victor D'Avella is currently a PhD student at the University of Chicago where he has taught first and second year Sanskrit. He holds a BA from New York University in Classics and an MPhil from Oxford University in Comparative Philology (Indo-Iranian). Victor's primary research focus is on the role of Sanskrit grammar in poetry and poetics although his interests extend to most areas of Sanskrit learning. He has taken multiple research trips to India to study Sanskrit in Mysore as well as Tamil in Madurai and Pondicherry.


Namgyal Dolkar

Namgyal Dolkar

Namgyal Dolkar graduated from the University of North Bengal, India with a BA in English, Geography, Political Science, and Education in 1988. From 1988 to 1992 she worked in the Department of Health of the Tibetan Government as an Assistant Project Officer. Ms. Dolkar has experience teaching Tibetan language to non-native speakers. She has worked at SASLI as a Faculty Assistant since 2003.


Fauzia Farooqui

Fauzia Farooqui received her Ph.D in Urdu literature from Lucknow University in 2004. Her major interests are Urdu language and literature, womens' studies, and literary criticism. She has published various short stories, poetry, and articles in leading Urdu literary journals. She has participated in many literary and cultural programs on Radio and TV. She is a native speaker of Urdu, Hindi and Awadhi; and has some knowledge of Persian. Farooqui is currently a lecturer of Urdu and Hindi at the University of Michigan. Previously, she worked as the program head as well as a full time language instructor at the American Institute of Indian Studies Urdu Language Program, Lucknow for several years. She has also previously taught Urdu literature at a Womens’ College, affiliated with Lucknow University. She is currently working on a project based on Hindi films with the help of funding from the University of Michigan.


Chris Haskett

Chris Haskett

Chris Haskett holds a degree in Religion from Columbia University. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the department of Languages and Cultures of Asia. Mr. Haskett has been teaching since 2006. He has taught First Semester Sanskrit and has been a teaching assistant for Introduction to Cultures of Asia and SASLI First Year Sanskrit, as well as Genres of Religious Writing. In the fall of 2008 he was a Fulbright Fellow at the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies in Sarnath, India.


Xi He

Xi He

Xi He received her MA from the department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. She is currently a Ph.D candidate in the same department. Ms. He's main interests are Sanskrit kaavya and poetic,s and Buddhist narratives. Her dissertation project focuses on the aesthetic and narrative aspects of the early Buddhist text the Lalitavistara.


Bandara Herath

Bandara Herath

Bandara Herath received his B.A. (Honors) in Sinhala (Second Class Upper Division) in 1986 from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. He is currently working on a masters and a doctorate degree in Sinhala at the same university. Mr. Herath works as a lecturer at Cornell University in New York and as a Sinhala Language Instructor/Cross Cultural Coordinator at the Intercollegiate Sri Lanka Education (ISLE) Program in Kandy, Sir Lanka. He has also worked as a lecturer at the University of Ruhuna Matara Sri Lanka (1988-1998) and Sinhala Language Instructor with the US Peace Corps Sri Lanka (1988-1990). He has authored an English Sinhala dictionary, a Sinhala phrase book, The Sinhala Reading Module, The Competency Based Sinhala text Book with Ms. Kamini de Abrew, and three reading books to learn Sinhala for non-Sinhala speakers.


Wafadar Husain

Wafadar Husain

Wafadar Husain holds an MA in Urdu from Lucknow University. He has eight years of experience working as an Urdu language instructor, and taught at the American Institute of Indian Studies Urdu language program in Lucknow from 2004 to 2008. He is a native speaker of Hindi, Urdu and Awadhi and has also taught courses in classical Arabic and Persian.


Shazia Iftkhar

Shazia Iftkhar is a native of Pakistan, who is a doctoral student and teaching assistant at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has a bachelor's degree in psychology from Dartmouth College, and a master's degree in journalism from Temple University in Philadelphia. She has been an instructor and teaching assistant (in journalism skills, grammar and writing, research-paper writing, publication design, public speaking, French and now Urdu) for four years. Shazia Iftkhar assisted in teaching first year Urdu for SASLI 2003 and 2004. Shazia is interested in studying the relationship between communication and identity, specifically in terms of diaspora, hybridity and postcolonial relationships in a globalizing world. She has spent summers interning as a copy editor at Newsday and The Philadelphia Inquirer and as a designer at the Cape Cod Times.


Qamar Jalil

Qamar Jalil

Qamar Jalil has been teaching for SASLI since 2005. He has a Master's degree from Punjab University, Lahore, Pakistan and has completed 6 courses toward an M.A. in South Asian studies from the University of Pennsylvania. Before coming to UW-Madison, Mr. Jalil taught Urdu in the Berkeley Urdu Language Program in Pakistan (BULPIP), a program of the University of California, Berkeley which has now moved to Lucknow, India. Mr. Jalil has been teaching Urdu as a second language to American students for almost 25 years.


Budhendra R. Joshee

Budhendra R. Joshee

A Nepali citizen and native Nepali speaker, Budhendra Joshee holds a degree in Political Science. He has been the Nepali Program Coordinator for the University of Wisconsin College Year In Nepal Program since 1982. Mr. Joshee is a certified language tester and has a record of language teaching spanning three decades which has included work with the American Peace Corps Volunteers, USAID/Nepal, Canadian Projects, British Volunteers and UNDP. He has worked as an instructor/lecturer for SASLI since 1988. Mr. Joshee has published a set of language instruction materials for Nepali, including the three volumes of A Practical Course In Spoken Nepali.


Abdul Rehman Khan

Abdul Rehman Khan

Rehman Khan has been teaching intensive Pashto language course to the beginner and intermediate level students at the South Asia Summer Language Institute (SASLI) program since 2009. Prior to his present teaching engagements, he has taught English as a second language at the University of Balochistan, Pakistan; Pashto language to high school students in Pakistan, and Human Ecology at Brandeis University, Massachusetts USA. He has also taught Pashto as a second language to non-native professional adults working in the development sectors in Afghanistan and Pakistan for around three years. He has recently been involved with the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), Lidget Green, University of Maryland, RosettaStone and American Council on Education (ACE) for varied Pashto language projects. Besides Pashto and English, Rehman possess native-like proficiency in Urdu and Hindi. He also has working knowledge of Dari, Persian, Balochi, Brahvi and Punjabi languages. He is an expert analyst of Afghanistan and Pakistan’s geo-political, socio-cultural and religio-cultural environment and has been giving talks on such topics in different parts of the United States.

As a Fulbright scholar to the USA, he received a master’s degree in Sustainable International Development from Brandies University, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA, and a master’s degree in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. Currently, Rehman is pursuing his doctoral degree from University of Wisconsin – Madison, USA in Development Studies/ Education.

Rehman is a native Pashtun and has worked with several print and electronic media sources as analyst, anchor person and newscaster; international organizations and UN agencies in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the social, political and economic development sector including the fields of education, health, women development, poverty reduction and human rights.

Rehman Khan’s areas of interest include historical and contemporary Afghanistan, comparative politics and education in Pakistan, Pak-Afghan relations with the west, and Pashtun culture, language and instruction. He can be reached at ark0510 at gmail dot com and/or arkhan at wisc dot edu.


Sarfaraz Khan

Sarfaraz Khan

Sarfaraz Khan is a native Pashto speaker; brought up and educated in Peshawar (Pakistan). Volunteered to serve the Pakistan Navy as an officer from 1962-2000 and retired as an R/Admiral. He did his Masters in Defense Studies, Masters in Educational Planning and Management (EPM), and Masters in Business Administration. For post graduate studies he attended the most prestigious institution; the Royal College of Defense Studies (RCDS) UK. From 1988-2000, he lectured regularly to the post graduate classes at the National Defense University, the Administrative Staff Colleges and the War Colleges of the Army, Navy and Air force of Pakistan. Worked for about two years at the University of South Florida (USF) on a project of the DLI to develop on-line Pashto and Urdu lessons. Since 2010, he has been associated with the ACTFL (American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages) as the ACTFL/DLI certified tester in Pashto and Urdu languages. Besides working with the languages, he loves to play golf and bridge in his free time.


Jampa Khedup

Jampa Khedup

Jampa Khedup is an associate lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He teaches Modern Tibetan Language and Tibetan Buddhism in the Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia. Mr. Khedup teaches during the academic year as well in the summer program at SASLI at Center for South Asia. He was born in Mysore, South India after his parents fled Tibet in 1959 and was raised as a Buddhist and at the age of 8 he joined St. John's High School in Bangalore City. At the age of 10 he joined Sera Monastic University and studied Buddhist philosophy, meditation , chanting, rituals, reading and writing in Tibetan language, and Tibetan grammar under the guidance of his teacher, the late Geshe Thabkey. He graduated from Sera Monastic University and obtained his Geshe degree in 1997 (PhD in Buddhist Philosophy). In 1998 he came to Deer Park Buddhist Center in Oregon, Wisconsin to assist his spiritual master Geshe Thabkey. During his stay at Deer Park Buddhist Center he gave numerous teachings, introductory lectures on Buddhism and meditation, and performed Buddhist chanting at local schools and for visiting groups and church groups.


Jesse R. Knutson

Jesse R. Knutson

Jesse Knutson completed his PhD from the Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago in March 2009. His interests include Sanskrit and Bengali literature, as well as ancient and medieval South Asian History. He taught Intermediate Sanskrit at SASLI in the summer of 2008, and since then has been teaching Sanskrit as a lecturer in the department of Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota.


Yaroslav Komarovski

Yaroslav Komarovski

Yaroslav Komarovski earned Ph.D. in History of Religions from the University of Virginia in 2007. During the 2007/2008 school year he worked as a Visiting Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Languages and Cultures of Asia, where he taught Tibetan Buddhism, Buddhist philosophy, and Buddhist ritual systems. Mr. Komarovski has extensive knowledge of classical and modern Tibetan language and literature across many genres. He has taught a variety of Tibetan language courses at the University of Virginia for several years, and served as an interpreter for Buddhist scholars and teachers from different Tibetan traditions for more than a decade. He studied in Tibetan monastic universities in Asia for nine years, and has been a part of many research opportunities. Beside Tibetan language, Mr. Komarovski specializes in Buddhist doctrinal systems, logic and epistemology, sectarian polemics, Buddhist interpretations of reality, contested models of the Buddhist paths, Buddhist rituals, and theories and practices of Buddhist Tantra. His current research focuses on intellectual developments in 15th century Tibet and their impact on subsequent intellectual history.


Ethan Kroll

Ethan Kroll

Ethan Kroll received his Ph.D. in South Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago and his J.D. from Stanford Law School.  He currently practices law in California.


Kalsang Gyatso Kunor

Kalsang Gyatso Kunor

Kalsang Gyatso Kunor is from Tibet and escaped to India in 1961 after the Chinese occupation of Tibet in 1959. He was educated in India at the University of Mysore and G.R. Institute of Secretarial Practice in Karnataka State, and in Isreal at the International Institute of Cooperatives. Mr. Kunor worked with the Tibetan Government in Exile in India for 19 years in various capacities, including 5 years in the Department of Education. He currently works as a Bilingual Resource Specialist in Tibetan with the Madison Metropolitan School District, and as a coordinator and teacher for the Saturday Tibetan Language and Culture School in Madison.


Palden Lakashak

Palden Lakashak

Palden Lakashak majored in History with minors in Philosophy and Economics from Hans Raj College at the University of Delhi, India. He went on to complete the Tibetan Teacher Training program at the School for International Training’s Center for Language and Cultural Study in 1989. Palden’s has ten years of teaching experience. He has primarily taught Tibetan language.


Shenghai Li

Shenghai Li

Shenghai Li is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia. He has conducted research in India for two years near Varanasi and Mysore. His doctoral work centers upon the seventh-century Indian writer Candrakirti with a focus on the notion and uses of scripture as well as education in classical Indian Buddhism. He was an instructor of Tibetan at University of Wisconsin-Madison in the academic year of 2004-2005.


Christine Marrewa-Karwoski

Christine Marrewa-Karwoski

Christine Marrewa Karwoski is a graduate student in The Department of Middle East, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. She currently holds two Master’s degrees, one from Columbia University’s Religion Department and the other from the University of Washington’s Department of Asian Languages and Literatures. Her current research is centered on printed narrative and its influence on the formation of religious identities in 19th and 20th century India.


Timsal Masud

After completing a PhD in Urdu literature from Lucknow University, Dr. Masud taught Urdu at the American Institute of Indian Studies in Lucknow. In 2009, he joined the University of Texas’s Hindi-Urdu Flagship program, where he develops teaching and assessment materials for Urdu courses. He has also published several short stories, translations, and articles. In 2009, he published an Urdu translation of Antoine de Saint-Exupery's Little Prince and in 2012, he published Mir Anis Ka Ek Marsiya. He is currently editing four volumes of Mir Anis's poetry.


Mithilesh K. Mishra

Mithilesh K. Mishra

Mithilesh K. Mishra has native speaker’s competence in Hindi, Maithili and Urdu. He reads and comprehends Sanskrit, has the ability to comprehend spoken Panjabi, and can read and comprehend Magahi, Bhojpuri, and Sadari. Mr. Mishra received his Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006. He has taught a number of Hindi courses at the University of Michigan, the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mr. Mishra has a number of research assistantships, publications, and papers. He organized a panel on the Variation in Hindi at the 24th Annual Conference on South Asia at UW-Madison. Among other honors, grants, and awards, Mishara has received the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor to develop lessons on Hindi Languages and Culture using multimedia.


Mahboob Ali

Mahboob Ali "Afsar" Mohammad

Afsar Mohammad holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Presently he is a lecturer in Asian Studies at the University of Texas-Austin. He is teaching 'South Asia and the Novel' 'Modern India and Literature''saints and yogis in South Asia" "pilgrimage in South Asia" "Devotion in South India" and Telugu courses. He has published three poetry collections, one short story collection and one book on modern literary theories. He has received many awards and honors including the Ugadi National Integration Honor from the Madras Telugu Academy. In 1991 he was awarded the Free Verse Front Award for the best poetry volume of the year. In 2007, he won the prestigious Bhaasha Samman Award from the Government of India for his collection of poems in Telugu. He is currently working on a book about Muslim devotional life in South India. He has been working for SASLI since the summer of 2003.


Ratheesh R. Nair

After receiving his Master degree in Malayalam Language and Literature from Mahatma Gandhi University, Ratheesh Nair worked in various academic institutions such as Kerala Kalamandalam (India), Universidad de Guanajuato (Mexico) and Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico). He taught Malayalam at SASLI in 2006. Apart from teaching, Mr. Nair is very involved in literary translation and theatrical studies. He has translated two novels by Mario Bellatin which are in the process of being published and will be considered pioneer direct translations from Spanish to Malayalam.


Richard Nance

Richard Nance

Richard Nance received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago Divinity School in 2004. His research focuses principally on the philosophy, history, and rhetoric of Indo-Tibetan Buddhism. In addition to his work at SASLI, he has taught courses in religious studies, philosophy, and writing at the University of Chicago, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and St. Xavier University.


Malathi Nidadavolu

Malathi Nidadavolu

Malathi Nidadavolu has masters' degree in English language and literature and also holds a masters' degree in library science. She is better known as a short-story writer of repute in her home country, Andhra Pradesh, India. Malathi worked as a librarian in Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, for nine years before arriving in the U.S. in 1973. She taught Telugu as Second Language at UW-Madison, during 1978-92 ( fall, spring, and summer). Malathi is currently working on developing teaching materials for the first and second years Telugu. This will be useful in the classroom as well as for online teaching. Malathi hosts a website, www.thulika.net, wherein she brings eminent Telugu fiction in English to non-heritage readers.


Katarzyna Pazucha

Katarzyna Pazucha

Katarzyna Pażucha holds a degree from Jagiellonian University, Poland in Indian Philology as well as a Master's degree from the University of Chicago. She is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Chicago in the South Asian Languages and Civilizations department. Ms. Pażucha has been involved with Sanskrit teaching since 2005. She has been an Instructor at the University of Chicago for First year Sanskrit as well as a Lecturer for Beginning and Intermediate Sanskrit at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Robert Phillips

Robert Phillips has a Masters in Languages and Cultures of Asia from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is currently completing doctoral work in Languages and Literatures of Asia. Phillips is fluent in Hindi and Urdu, and has taught Urdu previously for UW-Madison's intensive summer language program including SALSI 2003 and 2004. He has won fellowship awards that allowed him to participate in two intensive academic year language study programs in India and Pakistan, and has also worked as a program monitor for a semester abroad program located in India. While still a graduate student, Phillips has published an essay and translations in The Annual of Urdu Studies (1996, 1999, 2000).


Josh Pien

Josh Pien completed his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002 and his M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2005. He has spent several years in India studying and researching Hindi, Urdu, and related dialects. Josh is interested in sociolinguistic aspects of Northern Indian languages in general, and more specifically in the history of and relationship between Hindi and Urdu. He speaks Hindi and Urdu, reads Sanskrit, and has some knowledge of Avadhi, Brajbhasha, Panjabi, and Persian. The topic of his M.A. thesis was “Urdu and Persian Diglossia and the Standardization of Urdu.” Josh is entering the PhD program in Linguistics at the University of Michigan in the Fall of 2006 and is currently working on a textbook for Urdu/Hindi.


Sankaran Radhakrishnan

Sankaran Radhakrishnan

Sankaran Radhakrishnan is a faculty member in Asian studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He teaches Tamil language courses at the Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced levels, and Classical Tamil at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Mr. Radhakrishnan also teaches courses on Indian cultures, especially on South Indian cultural history and civilizations. He has had experience in teaching Tamil language and culture, and Tamil literature for about two and a half decades. Mr. Radhakrishnan's areas of specialization are language pedagogy, materials production, and cultural studies.


Aminur Rahman

Aminur Rahman

Aminur Rahman received his PhD from the University of Manchester, UK in 2009, funded by the British ORS-OSS. His project examines a culturally coded and historically constructed space and time - imperial Britain and the colonial period respectively - from the perspective of colonized Indian travelers. At present, Aminur is working as a Lecturer in Bengali language and literature at the University of Virginia. Aminur received his Graduation (1989) and Post-graduation (1991) in Bengali language and literature from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Since his post-graduation, Aminur worked with a number of universities. Before joining at the University of Virginia, Aminur taught at Bangladesh Open University, University of Dhaka, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Besides Bengali language, in those appointments he taught several courses on colonial and postcolonial Bengali literature, the politics of colonial and postcolonial cultural representation, Bengali travel narratives, Gender and Gendered literature in Bengali, Partition and Bengali literature. Aminur is a native Bengali speaker and interested in teaching Bengali in a way where understanding cultural heritage is always considered as important as communicating. His research interest lies in second language accusation, history and literature of colonial and postcolonial Bengal, third space, travel narratives and functionality of literature.


Ashok Kumar Rajput

Ashok Kumar Rajput holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A native speaker of Hindi-Urdu, Sindhi and Rajasthani, he has taught Hindi-Urdu at the UW since 1995. Besides South Asian languages, Rajput has formal language training in French and German. Ashok Rajput has taught the Elementary and Advanced Urdu classes for SASLI 2003 and also courses in Anthropology and Urdu at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He was a recipient of variuos fellowships including Wenner Gren Foundation and a summer fellowship from the Smithsonian Instituition. His academic interests include ethnomusicology, media, and religion and politics in South Asia. Rajput has recently completed a reader, Beginning Urdu, his third publication after Representing the Unrepresented: Portrayal of Women in Pakistan Television Programs (UNDP, 1998), and Musical Survey of Pakistan: Three Pilot Studies (Lok Virsa, 1989).


Milind Ranade

Milind Ranade is an instructor for Marathi Language at University of Pennsylvania and instructor for Hindi at Temple University, Philadelphia. He is working as a Political Cartoonist in India for almost 30 years. He also is a trained Cameraman and a Film Producer and Director and Animator. He has been writing prose and poetry in Marathi language since his school days. He has written, produced and directed a Marathi Feature Film " Lutaloot" and has written a cartoon compilation book " Cartoon Yatra." Milind also designs and illustrates books and book covers. Currently he designs and operates www. marathimanoos.com, a web site dedicated to Marathi language and Culture.


Sameer Rane

Sameer Rane

Sameer holds masters degree from University of Mumbai in Marathi language & Literature. He has been working as a lecturer in Marathi since 1998. He has also worked as a writer and translator for Marathi language. Other qualification: M. A. (English) University of Pune; M. Ed. (Curriculum and Instruction) University of Massachusetts- Amherst; B.A. (History) University of Mumbai; B. Ed. University of Mumbai. Professional Interest: Critical Pedagogy & Teacher Education; Spiritual Cinema: East and West


Thomas Robertson

Thomas Robertson

Thomas Robertson is finishing a Ph.D. program in environmental history at UW-Madison. He has been awarded a post-doctoral fellowship in world history at Rutgers University. He first went to Nepal as an School for International Training student in 1988, then served as a Peace Corps volunteer from 1992 to 1996. Tom worked as the academic coordinater for the Pitzer College in Nepal program during the 1999-2000 school year.


Kristen Rudisill

Kristen Rudisill

Kristen Rudisill is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Popular Culture and also teaches in the Asian Studies Program at Bowling Green State University. She earned her Ph.D. in Asian Studies at the University of Texas, Austin in 2007. She has been studying Tamil since 1998. She served as the faculty assistant for the Intermediate Tamil class at SASLI in 2005 and is happy to be back. Her research interests focus on Indian theater and dance.


Brajesh Samarth

Brajesh Samarth

Dr. Brajesh Samarth is a linguistic anthropologist with a focus on the cultural ramifications of language maintenance and attrition in the Indian Diaspora. He is a scholar of Hindi, Urdu, and Sanskrit and currently teaches Indic languages at Stanford University. Originally from Jaipur Rajasthan, he earned degrees in Hindi Literature and Sociology, while his doctorate is from the University of Wisconsin.


Arun Raja Selvan

Arun Raja Selvan

Dr. Arun Raja Selvan has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Madurai Kamaraj University, with a focus on “Problems in Translating English into Tamil.” He has taught Tamil Language and Linguistics in Madurai, India, for over 23 years, working with American Students studying with the South India Term Abroad (SITA), the American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He has also worked as a facilitator and language instructor for various scholars and fellows conducting research in Tamil Nadu.  Dr. Selvan first began teaching at SASLI in the summer of 2012.


Mr. Shah

Mr. Shah

Mr. Shah is a graduate in English Literature & Linguistics, from the University of Peshawar, N-WFP, Pakistan. After completing his masters, he started teaching in the Department of English, Islamia College, at the University of Peshawar. His tribal background impelled him to serve in one of the government colleges of the tribal areas and he started teaching English as a subject and language at Govt. College LandiKotal, Khyber Agency, in the Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA), Pakistan. In addition to English, he taught Pashto, there, as a volunteer. After working for five years at the Govt. College LandiKotal, Mr. Shah was awarded the Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant Scholarship and taught Pashto in the Penn Language Center at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. While he was there, he worked on developing materials for teaching Pashto. He also worked for the Linguistic Data Consortium on a Pashto project and assisted the consortium in translation, web-scouting, NE tagging, and Pashto Grammar editing and developing. Mr. Shah returned to Pakistan in 2007 and began teaching as a Lecturer in English at Kohat University of Science & Technology. The US Embassy gave him the project of developing the English language skills of students of tribal areas in Pakistan, and crystallizing their vision of cultures across the globe. Presently, Mr. Shah is working as a lecturer in English and a coordinator at the Access English Scholarship Program at Kohat University of Science & Technology, Kohat, Pakistan.


Ahmed Shamim

Ahmed Shamim

Ahmed Shamim  has an MA in Linguistics from the Graduate Center, City University of New York and is now working toward completing his doctoral degree in Linguistics there. His research interests include language policies and ideologies, endangered language documentation, and the descriptive grammar of Bangla. He also holds an MA in English literature from Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh.

Mr. Shamim has taught a range of courses, including linguistics, Bangla language, and English literature at several universities in Bangladesh. He has been teaching linguistics at CUNY LaGuardia Community College since 2011. He started teaching Bangla at SASLI from summer 2012.


Faraz Masood Sheikh

Faraz Masood Sheikh

Faraz Masood Sheikh holds a Masters in Near Eastern and Islamic Studies from Indiana University Bloomington. He is currently a Ph.D. student in Religious Studies, with a minor in NELC. Mr. Sheikh has been taking part in teaching Urdu since 2004. In addition to Urdu, he has taught courses on South Asian Muslim Culture and Politics. He has also assisted professors in teaching courses like Introduction to Christianity and Biblical Interpretation.


Kashika Singh

Kashika Singh

Kashika Singh teaches Hindi at the elementary, intermediate and advanced level. She has taught for SASLI since 2004 and has been an Associate Lecturer for the Language and Culture of Asia since the fall of 2006. Ms. Singh has her Masters in Hindi Literature from Kashi Vidayabeedh University. She also has a bachelor's in English Literature. Ms. Singh gained extensive experience teaching Hindi in intensive formats at the School for International Training in India. She has taught for the University of Wisconsin College Year in India program for seven years as well as the study abroad program in Varanarsi, "Where there be dragons", and the University of Emory program in Jodhpur. Ms. Singh enjoys teaching Hindi and has excelled at adapting her teaching for the different programs. Ms. Singh has also assisted students in research translations and interviews discussing cultural topics.


Virendra Singh

Virendra Singh

Virendra Singh holds a degree in Philosophy and Political Science at Allahabad University in India. He has an outstanding record of experience in language instruction spanning 30 years which includesPeace Corps training, Hindi instruction for the College Year in India Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and private instruction for research scholars, diplomats, musicians, etc. Mr. Singh has also worked as a research assistant and translator for graduate researchers in Varanasi, using Braj, Avadhi, Bhojpuri, and medieval Hindi texts dealing with subjects such as folk music, death and dying, Indian drama, and religion. He has taught adult literacy classes and has founded a village elementary in Jaipur. Mr. Singh is the co-author, with Margaret Robinson, of an entry-level Hindi reader 'Beginning Hindi-Urdu.'


Samuel Sudanandha

Samuel Sudanandha

Samuel Sudanandha's studies began at Madurai Kamaraj University in India. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and a Master of Arts in Tamil Language and Literature. At the University of Washington, Seattle he received his PhD in Anthropology. Mr. Sudanandha teaching experiences include being the professor in charge of teaching Tamil Literature to candidates of the Indian Civil Service Examination in Madurai, India, as well as working as a professor of Tamil at the University of Wisconsin Year in India Program. In 2006 he retired from his position at the undergraduate department of Tamil at the American College in Madurai. He is currently teaching at Columbia University. Mr. Sudanandha has over thirty years of experience teaching. He has received many fellowships and awards; among them, a Fellowship at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington in 1989. He has presented many papers, and organized a number of symposia.


Babu Suthar

Babu Suthar

Babu Suthar is a Gujarati Lecturer in South Asia Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Suthar is primarily interested in South Asian Linguistics and Typological Linguistics and is completing doctoral work on Agreement in Gujarati. Mr. Suthar has an impressive academic record, having published many articles on various topics in linguistics and linguistic philosophy, and on literary theories in Gujarati, including a recently published co-authored piece on Gujarati language in Indo-Aryan Languages (RoutledgeCurzon, 2003). Mr. Suthar has prepared extensive language materials including three textbooks, one learner's dictionary, and books on Gujarati thematic vocabulary, pedagogic grammar and parts of speech. Mr. Suthar is also an accomplished creative writer, and has published four experimental novels called Kachando ane Darpan, Srmad Kagadapacchisi, Vakyakatha and Valgad. The fifth novel, Nidraviyoga, is in press. In addition to his novels, Mr. Suthar has published a poem collection called Gurujaapa and has a second, Sapphera, in press. His short stories Dhuliyo and Lulo have been translated in English. He has also written a long fairy tale for children, Ek hato chokaro, commissioned by the Ministry of Culture in India.


Tenzin Thosam

Tenzin Thosam

Tenzin Thosam studied Chinese and Tibetan languages and literature at Qinhai Minority University in Xi-ning, Amdo in 1989. He completed basic and advanced courses on Tibetan Buddhism in Kumbum Monastery, Amdo from 1989 to 1997. In 2004 he completed the Master’s Program at the University of Virginia in their Department of Religious Studies. Thosam worked as a tour guide and interpreter between Chinese and Tibetan for Tibetan Buddhist Lamas from 1992 to 1997. From 1999 to 2000 Thosam was the Tour director for the U.S. Tour of Monks of Drepung Gomang Monastery of Southern India. He worked as interpreter and translator for the Dorjeling Buddhist Center in New York and Atlanta from 1999-2001. More recently, Thosam has taught Chinese in the Department of Middle East Language and Cultures at the University of Virginia and in 2003 and 2004 has taught Principles of Tibetan Buddhist Debate at UVA.


Audrey Truschke

Audrey Truschke

Audrey Truschke is currently pursuing her Ph.D. at Columbia University in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies. Her research focuses on encounters between Sanskrit and Persian literary cultures in Mughal India. She has previously taught Sanskrit at Columbia University.


Gautama Vajracharya

Dr. Gautama V. Vajracharya is a Sanskritist with a deep interest in South Asian languages, art and culture. He has been teaching Nepali language at the University of Wisconsin since 1981. In his youth, he went to gurukula type of traditional Sanskrit school. He started his carrier as an editor of Nepali journal called Purnima and published about 50 articles and 4 books on Nepalese history and culture. He received a prestigious Rockefeller grant to study Nepalese and Tibetan works at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California. Later on, he earned a master degree in art history at the Claremont Graduate School, California, and a PhD in South Asian language and culture at the Department of South Asian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison. Recently he finished writing a monograph on monsoonal culture of South Asia, which has been accepted to be published by Marg in 2012.


Sarah Waheed

Sarah Waheed has a masters degree in the Social Sciences from University of Chicago and is currently doing doctoral work at Tufts University in History. Sarah's work focuses on questions of morality, obscenity, and early 20th century Urdu literary history.


Blake Wentworth

Blake Wentworth

Blake Wentworth is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago. His work concentrates on the theistic religions of south India, with a particular focus on their Tamil and Sanskrit literary expressions. At present he is working on a critical study of the Tamil Ulas, a literary genre that depicts the processions of gods and heroes.

SASLI
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Fax: 608-265-3302

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